The life of a photographer who likes to shoot just about anything.

Author Archive

The Cathedral in Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavik, Iceland

Hallgrimskirkja, the Cathedral in Reykjavik.
Standing before the church is a statue of Leifur Eiriksson.


Pie Town

Pie Town, Arizona

While on the road in Arizona, we passed through “Pie Town”.
It was closed so we couldn’t buy any pie.


Life in New York City

New York City

Always busy.


Streets of San Francisco

Cable Car, San Francisco

The Cable Car.
A San Francisco tradition.


The General Store

The-General-Store

Part of Americana that one doesn’t see much anymore.

Photograph taken in Pennsylvania several years ago using 35mm slide film.


Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge is breathtaking when covered in fog.


Global Warming

I’m doing my part to combat global warming, climate change and reducing my carbon footprint.


Watching the Neighbors

Dover Caste, Dover England, English Channel

Photograph was made looking out a window
in Dover Castle, Dover, England.
The English Channel is visible in the distance.


Monument Valley…

Monument Valley, Clouds, B&W, Black and white photography, fine art

…in black and white.


Fireworks!

fireworks

It finally feels like summer. Let the fireworks begin!


The Flatiron Building

Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building in New York City is usually
photographed in the front.
This is a view of the famous icon from the rear.


A Storm’s Coming!

Atlantic city, Ocean, Storm, Rain

Threatening clouds and rain over Atlantic City.


The Sky over Canyon de Chelly

Canyon de Chelly, Arizona, Navajo Tribal Land, Navajo Nation, National Park

Looking down into the Canyon.


Father’s Day

jason, ashley, child, children, father's day

On July 14, 1989 I became a father. (My first, real, Father’s Day.) I didn’t know it at the time, but I had set sail on the happiest journey of my life.
My mom raised me. My parents were married, but it was a bad marriage, so I didn’t have a Dad. When I became one, I was never nervous, worried, insecure or any other negative emotion. I was absolutely confident in my ability to be a Dad. I wasn’t cocky. I simply knew to give my son (and daughter, born January 13, 1995) what I didn’t have. A real Dad. It was that simple for me.
How do I define “a real Dad”? Someone who takes care of their children. Period. Whatever needs to get done, you do it. There are no gender specific job duties. Diapers? Change them. Time to eat? Feed them. Doctor’s appointment? Take them. And on and on and on. (For the record, there is one thing I cannot do – cleanup vomit. It’s my personal kryptonite.)
There are gender differences in how we raise our children. The theory goes, Mothers tend to be more nurturing. Fathers tend to tell their children to “Go for it!” Some will discount that theory, but there ARE going to be gender differences. How can there NOT be? There are also our individual talents. My wife and I employ those different, non-gender, talents in raising our children. When she says, “Go ask your Dad,” or I say the reverse, it isn’t to shirk any responsibility, it’s because the other parent is simply better in those specific situations.
Getting back to those “job duties”, I took my children to daycare. It was onsite at my job at a hospital. It also made “visits to the doctor” very easy. I’d do it during work hours. Would I really hand that job over to my wife because it’s a “mother’s job”? I’m pragmatic, not an idiot.
I’ve always done the food shopping. Being raised by just my Mom, I had to go with her. Then when I got my driver’s license, I drove to the supermarket. That routine has stayed with me. When my children were old enough, they tagged along.
For them, growing up meant that if they asked me to do something and I said “yes”, they knew that I meant it. Questions would concern going to the movies, sleepovers, school sports, vacation, whatever. I wanted them to always trust what I would say. As a Dad I knew not to promise what I couldn’t (or wouldn’t) deliver. There are drawbacks to that approach. For years my son kept asking me to take him to San Francisco. I didn’t want to say “no” and wouldn’t say “yes” to appease him. (We did go.) He also wanted to go to London because my wife and I been there. (We went.) He also asked me to take him to Japan. I told him he’s on his own with that one.
In 1990 I started the tradition of reading, and videotaping, “Twas the Night before Christmas” on Christmas Eve. Several years ago when my son was around 23 years old and on a date, he said, “Don’t worry Dad, I’ll be home in time.” Yes, we’re still doing it.
I’ve mentioned my son, but everything above also applies to my daughter. In 1999, because my wife had a job change and couldn’t go on vacation, I went on a Father/Son trip. He was 10 at the time. My daughter was 4. She remembered that and demanded, when she was older, that she’d have a Father/Daughter one. (We did.) Now that my son is (almost) 27 and doesn’t want to go on our family vacations anymore (I agree with his reasoning), I told my daughter, “Well I guess it’s just Mom and me now.” Her answer? “Heck no. You’re not cheating me. I’ve got several more years of going with you.”
As a photographer, I’ve taken millions of photos. I’ve also videotaped a lot. (I recommend that for any parent. My “adult” kids love looking at the photos and videos.)
Naturally not every day was fun. Illnesses, arguments, fights and tantrums are all part of the equation of being a Dad, but there are 3 quotes that answer all questions –
1) “I want to be a Dad just like my Dad,” my son said, when he was around 12.
2) “I love you,” texted my daughter yesterday for no particular reason.
3) And, at my son’s college graduation family dinner I said to him (and this applies to my daughter), “I am very proud of you. You keep me on my toes. I’m always questioning the validity of my advice. And you’ve made my life perfect.”

JayAshl20140813JayAsh


A Chair in Iceland

Iceland, Ring Road, Route 1, Chair, Mountains, Overcast, Clouds

Spotted somewhere on the Ring Road tour (Route 1) in Iceland.


To Boldly Go…….

Full Moon

Partial view of a full moon.
Photographed using a Celestron 8 inch telescope.


Brighton, England

Brighton, England, Beach, Ocean, Swimming

Sunbathers enjoying a beautiful day at the beach in Brighton, England.


Sunset in Monument Valley

monument valley, arizona

Sunset in Monument Valley.


The Tunnel

tunnel, san francisco, california

The light at the end of the tunnel.


Bryce Canyon Trees

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, Hike, Hiking, Trail

While walking a trail in Bryce Canyon, I found these trees.
It is absolutely amazing where life will grow.


Controlled Burn

Firefighter at working performing a controlled burn.


World War II Memorial

World War II Memorial, Washington DC

In honor of all the soldiers who have died . . .


The Ceiling

Smithsonian-Museum

Don’t forget to look up. The ceiling in a section
of the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C.


Mesa Arch Sunrise

Mesa Arch Sunrise, Canyonlands National Park, Moab, Utah

Mesa Arch Sunrise in Canyonlands National Park in Moab, Utah.
A popular and beautiful destination for many photographers, both professional and amateur.
If you decide to go, arrive hours before sunrise. It gets busy!