The life of a photographer who likes to shoot just about anything.

Posts tagged “child

Blowing Bubbles

Young lady having a grand ole time!


Aquaboy

They’re casting for another superhero. Enter- Aquaboy!


Defeat!

Haven’t we all been there?


Children are Children

A group portrait taken back in the 1970’s in my hometown Paterson, NJ (home of the great Lou Costello).


The Eyes of a Little Girl

Shot with T-Max 400, developed and printed in my darkroom.


A Street Performer in London

Man on a unicycle performs in front of a crowd with a little girl.

A street performer and a little girl
in London’s Covent Garden entertain a crowd of people.


Portrait of an Anarchist

Portrait made with polaroid film using a 4×5 Wisner camera.


Young Lady

Arundel, England, Child, Girl

Young lady somewhere in England.


Young Lady in Arundel

Arundel, England, Child, Girl

Several years ago while in London, I walked into the Victoria train station and spoke to a employee behind the ticket counter. I told him of my disappointment in visiting Stratford-Upon-Avon. I said that it felt “Americanized” and wanted to see something “British”. He recommended traveling to Arundel. It’s about an hour south of London. My wife and I traveled on a train that reminded me of the one the Beatles rode on in “A Hard Day’s Night”. The view of the countryside was beautiful, and when the train approached Arundel, a castle came into view on the horizon. It was like an Errol Flynn movie. (Uh oh, it sounds like I’m Americanizing it…)
Arundel is a small town, around 3000 people with castle. My wife and I explored it and then walked around the town. During that journey, the young girl seen above, stood for a moment as I caught her image on film.


Father’s Day

jason, ashley, child, children, father's day

On July 14, 1989 I became a father. (My first, real, Father’s Day.) I didn’t know it at the time, but I had set sail on the happiest journey of my life.
My mom raised me. My parents were married, but it was a bad marriage, so I didn’t have a Dad. When I became one, I was never nervous, worried, insecure or any other negative emotion. I was absolutely confident in my ability to be a Dad. I wasn’t cocky. I simply knew to give my son (and daughter, born January 13, 1995) what I didn’t have. A real Dad. It was that simple for me.
How do I define “a real Dad”? Someone who takes care of their children. Period. Whatever needs to get done, you do it. There are no gender specific job duties. Diapers? Change them. Time to eat? Feed them. Doctor’s appointment? Take them. And on and on and on. (For the record, there is one thing I cannot do – cleanup vomit. It’s my personal kryptonite.)
There are gender differences in how we raise our children. The theory goes, Mothers tend to be more nurturing. Fathers tend to tell their children to “Go for it!” Some will discount that theory, but there ARE going to be gender differences. How can there NOT be? There are also our individual talents. My wife and I employ those different, non-gender, talents in raising our children. When she says, “Go ask your Dad,” or I say the reverse, it isn’t to shirk any responsibility, it’s because the other parent is simply better in those specific situations.
Getting back to those “job duties”, I took my children to daycare. It was onsite at my job at a hospital. It also made “visits to the doctor” very easy. I’d do it during work hours. Would I really hand that job over to my wife because it’s a “mother’s job”? I’m pragmatic, not an idiot.
I’ve always done the food shopping. Being raised by just my Mom, I had to go with her. Then when I got my driver’s license, I drove to the supermarket. That routine has stayed with me. When my children were old enough, they tagged along.
For them, growing up meant that if they asked me to do something and I said “yes”, they knew that I meant it. Questions would concern going to the movies, sleepovers, school sports, vacation, whatever. I wanted them to always trust what I would say. As a Dad I knew not to promise what I couldn’t (or wouldn’t) deliver. There are drawbacks to that approach. For years my son kept asking me to take him to San Francisco. I didn’t want to say “no” and wouldn’t say “yes” to appease him. (We did go.) He also wanted to go to London because my wife and I been there. (We went.) He also asked me to take him to Japan. I told him he’s on his own with that one.
In 1990 I started the tradition of reading, and videotaping, “Twas the Night before Christmas” on Christmas Eve. Several years ago when my son was around 23 years old and on a date, he said, “Don’t worry Dad, I’ll be home in time.” Yes, we’re still doing it.
I’ve mentioned my son, but everything above also applies to my daughter. In 1999, because my wife had a job change and couldn’t go on vacation, I went on a Father/Son trip. He was 10 at the time. My daughter was 4. She remembered that and demanded, when she was older, that she’d have a Father/Daughter one. (We did.) Now that my son is (almost) 27 and doesn’t want to go on our family vacations anymore (I agree with his reasoning), I told my daughter, “Well I guess it’s just Mom and me now.” Her answer? “Heck no. You’re not cheating me. I’ve got several more years of going with you.”
As a photographer, I’ve taken millions of photos. I’ve also videotaped a lot. (I recommend that for any parent. My “adult” kids love looking at the photos and videos.)
Naturally not every day was fun. Illnesses, arguments, fights and tantrums are all part of the equation of being a Dad, but there are 3 quotes that answer all questions –
1) “I want to be a Dad just like my Dad,” my son said, when he was around 12.
2) “I love you,” texted my daughter yesterday for no particular reason.
3) And, at my son’s college graduation family dinner I said to him (and this applies to my daughter), “I am very proud of you. You keep me on my toes. I’m always questioning the validity of my advice. And you’ve made my life perfect.”

JayAshl20140813JayAsh


Little Girl

child, little girl, daughter

She does the laundry.


Father’s Day

jason, ashley, child, children, father's day

On July 14, 1989 I became a father. (My first, real, Father’s Day.) I didn’t know it at the time, but I had set sail on the happiest journey of my life.
My mom raised me. My parents were married, but it was a bad marriage, so I didn’t have a Dad. When I became one, I was never nervous, worried, insecure or any other negative emotion. I was absolutely confident in my ability to be a Dad. I wasn’t cocky. I simply knew to give my son (and daughter, born January 13, 1995) what I didn’t have. A real Dad. It was that simple for me.
How do I define “a real Dad”? Someone who takes care of their children. Period. Whatever needs to get done, you do it. There are no gender specific job duties. Diapers? Change them. Time to eat? Feed them. Doctor’s appointment? Take them. And on and on and on. (For the record, there is one thing I cannot do – cleanup vomit. It’s my personal kryptonite.)
There are gender differences in how we raise our children. The theory goes, Mothers tend to be more nurturing. Fathers tend to tell their children to “Go for it!” Some will discount that theory, but there ARE going to be gender differences. How can there NOT be? There are also our individual talents. My wife and I employ those different, non-gender, talents in raising our children. When she says, “Go ask your Dad,” or I say the reverse, it isn’t to shirk any responsibility, it’s because the other parent is simply better in those specific situations.
Getting back to those “job duties”, I took my children to daycare. It was onsite at my job at a hospital. It also made “visits to the doctor” very easy. I’d do it during work hours. Would I really hand that job over to my wife because it’s a “mother’s job”? I’m pragmatic, not an idiot.
I’ve always done the food shopping. Being raised by just my Mom, I had to go with her. Then when I got my driver’s license, I drove to the supermarket. That routine has stayed with me. When my children were old enough, they tagged along.
For them, growing up meant that if they asked me to do something and I said “yes”, they knew that I meant it. Questions would concern going to the movies, sleepovers, school sports, vacation, whatever. I wanted them to always trust what I would say. As a Dad I knew not to promise what I couldn’t (or wouldn’t) deliver. There are drawbacks to that approach. For years my son kept asking me to take him to San Francisco. I didn’t want to say “no” and wouldn’t say “yes” to appease him. (We did go.) He also wanted to go to London because my wife and I been there. (We went.) He also asked me to take him to Japan. I told him he’s on his own with that one.
In 1990 I started the tradition of reading, and videotaping, “Twas the Night before Christmas” on Christmas Eve. Several years ago when my son was around 23 years old and on a date, he said, “Don’t worry Dad, I’ll be home in time.” Yes, we’re still doing it.
I’ve mentioned my son, but everything above also applies to my daughter. In 1999, because my wife had a job change and couldn’t go on vacation, I went on a Father/Son trip. He was 10 at the time. My daughter was 4. She remembered that and demanded, when she was older, that she’d have a Father/Daughter one. (We did.) Now that my son is (almost) 27 and doesn’t want to go on our family vacations anymore (I agree with his reasoning), I told my daughter, “Well I guess it’s just Mom and me now.” Her answer? “Heck no. You’re not cheating me. I’ve got several more years of going with you.”
As a photographer, I’ve taken millions of photos. I’ve also videotaped a lot. (I recommend that for any parent. My “adult” kids love looking at the photos and videos.)
Naturally not every day was fun. Illnesses, arguments, fights and tantrums are all part of the equation of being a Dad, but there are 3 quotes that answer all questions –
1) “I want to be a Dad just like my Dad,” my son said, when he was around 12.
2) “I love you,” texted my daughter yesterday for no particular reason.
3) And, at my son’s college graduation family dinner I said to him (and this applies to my daughter), “I am very proud of you. You keep me on my toes. I’m always questioning the validity of my advice. And you’ve made my life perfect.”

JayAshl20140813JayAsh


Father’s Day

children, father's day

On July 14, 1989 I became a father. (My first, real, Father’s Day.) I didn’t know it at the time, but I had set sail on the happiest journey of my life.
My mom raised me. My parents were married, but it was a bad marriage, so I didn’t have a Dad. When I became one, I was never nervous, worried, insecure or any other negative emotion. I was absolutely confident in my ability to be a Dad. I wasn’t cocky. I simply knew to give my son (and daughter, born January 13, 1995) what I didn’t have. A real Dad. It was that simple for me.
How do I define “a real Dad”? Someone who takes care of their children. Period. Whatever needs to get done, you do it. There are no gender specific job duties. Diapers? Change them. Time to eat? Feed them. Doctor’s appointment? Take them. And on and on and on. (For the record, there is one thing I cannot do – cleanup vomit. It’s my personal kryptonite.)
There are gender differences in how we raise our children. The theory goes, Mothers tend to be more nurturing. Fathers tend to tell their children to “Go for it!” Some will discount that theory, but there ARE going to be gender differences. How can there NOT be? There are also our individual talents. My wife and I employ those different, non-gender, talents in raising our children. When she says, “Go ask your Dad,” or I say the reverse, it isn’t to shirk any responsibility, it’s because the other parent is simply better in those specific situations.
Getting back to those “job duties”, I took my children to daycare. It was onsite at my job at a hospital. It also made “visits to the doctor” very easy. I’d do it during work hours. Would I really hand that job over to my wife because it’s a “mother’s job”? I’m pragmatic, not an idiot.
I’ve always done the food shopping. Being raised by just my Mom, I had to go with her. Then when I got my driver’s license, I drove to the supermarket. That routine has stayed with me. When my children were old enough, they tagged along.
For them, growing up meant that if they asked me to do something and I said “yes”, they knew that I meant it. Questions would concern going to the movies, sleepovers, school sports, vacation, whatever. I wanted them to always trust what I would say. As a Dad I knew not to promise what I couldn’t (or wouldn’t) deliver. There are drawbacks to that approach. For years my son kept asking me to take him to San Francisco. I didn’t want to say “no” and wouldn’t say “yes” to appease him. (We did go.) He also wanted to go to London because my wife and I been there. (We went.) He also asked me to take him to Japan. I told him he’s on his own with that one.
In 1990 I started the tradition of reading, and videotaping, “Twas the Night before Christmas” on Christmas Eve. Several years ago when my son was around 23 years old and on a date, he said, “Don’t worry Dad, I’ll be home in time.” Yes, we’re still doing it.
I’ve mentioned my son, but everything above also applies to my daughter. In 1999, because my wife had a job change and couldn’t go on vacation, I went on a Father/Son trip. He was 10 at the time. My daughter was 4. She remembered that and demanded, when she was older, that she’d have a Father/Daughter one. (We did.) Now that my son is (almost) 26 and doesn’t want to go on our family vacations anymore (I agree with his reasoning), I told my daughter, “Well I guess it’s just Mom and me now.” Her answer? “Heck no. You’re not cheating me. I’ve got several more years of going with you.”
As a photographer, I’ve taken “zillions” of photos. I’ve also videotaped a lot. (I recommend that for any parent. My “adult” kids love looking at the photos and videos.)
Naturally not every day was fun. Illnesses, arguments, fights and tantrums are all part of the equation of being a Dad, but there are 3 quotes that answer all questions –
1) “I want to be a Dad just like my Dad,” my son said, when he was around 12.
2) “I love you,” texted my daughter yesterday for no particular reason.
3) And, at my son’s college graduation family dinner I said to him (and this applies to my daughter), “I am very proud of you. You keep me on my toes. I’m always questioning the validity of my advice. And you’ve made my life perfect.”

JayAshl20140813JayAsh


Young Lady in Arundel

Arundel, England, Child, Girl

Several years ago while in London, I walked into the Victoria train station and spoke to a employee behind the ticket counter. I told him of my disappointment in visiting Stratford-Upon-Avon. I said that it felt “Americanized” and wanted to see something “British”. He recommended traveling to Arundel. It’s about an hour south of London. My wife and I traveled on a train that reminded me of the one the Beatles rode on in “A Hard Day’s Night”. The view of the countryside was beautiful, and when the train approached Arundel, a castle came into view on the horizon. It was like an Errol Flynn movie. (Uh oh, it sounds like I’m Americanizing it…)
Arundel is a small town, around 3000 people with castle. My wife and I explored it and then walked around the town. During that journey, the young girl seen above, stood for a moment as I caught her image on film.


On Thanksgiving….

Disney-Jason-Ashley-MagicKingdom

…this is what my wife and I am thankful for.


London Entertainment

Man on a unicycle performs in front of a crowd with a little girl.

A street performer and a little girl
in London’s Covent Garden entertain a crowd of people.


Underwater

Swimming pool, swimmer, child, boy

One of my favorite underwater photographs made several years ago.


An American on the 4th of July

Child, Girl, Female, American Flag, Flag, American, Patriot, Patriotism, July 4th

Every year for the 4th of July, I see fireworks. Sometimes it’s live and sometimes it’s on TV. And I like to play John Philip Sousa’s music in my backyard. I know it’s corny, but I am an American and I want to celebrate. And I want to do so with other Americans.

On another matter, many Americans hyphenate themselves – African/Italian/Irish/Hispanic/etc.-American. I don’t. I am of European descent, but I am no more European than I am African or Asian. It’s stated that America is the land of immigrants. Obviously that’s true, but the entire Western Hemisphere is the result of European, African slave and Asian immigration. Before Columbus made that fateful voyage there was no Peru, Canada, Cuba, Argentina…well, you get the picture. America has used immigration to it’s advantage – attracting some of the best and brightest (along with some not so great). In Cuba, Brazil and other nations that also had black slaves, their descendants don’t hyphenate their nationality. They refer to themselves as Cuban, Brazilian, etc. It was a black Canadian who pointed this fact out to me. She was proud to be Canadian, didn’t hyphenate her nationality, and pointed out to me that this was the only country where people didn’t want to say they were from. How many generations of descendants need to be born before you can say that you’re an American? Italians are the descendants of the Romans but they don’t refer to themselves as Italian-Romans. When will we stop hyphenating ourselves and simply say that we’re American? I wonder.

At this moment I want to wish all Americans “Happy Independence Day”! Buy a flag and fly it. Tens of thousands of white, black, asian, hispanic – you know, Americans – fought and died for your independence. Fly the flag in their memory.


Disappointment

amusement park ride, child, little girl

A summertime vacation ride at an amusement park
should be fun and exciting for a little girl.
So why is this little girl crying?
Because she doesn’t have the front seat on
this two person ride. Which goes to show,
even when you have everything you want,
disappointment is still a possibility.

Photographed in the days of film.
Processed and printed in my (former) darkroom.


School Bus

School bus, student, boy, education

Several years ago I had to opportunity to photograph a children’s calendar.
It was a wonderful project where I could pick the children and
the places to photograph them. All photographs were taken in B&W,
film developed and printed in my darkroom.


Now on Tumblr!

Pope, tumblr

Decided to start a Rich Green Photo tumblr page. Stop by and take a look!

(The content will be a little different than what you see around here.
And yes, that me. I used to play priest when I was a kid.
I think that qualifies me for the Pope job.)


Sweet Cheeks

Strawberries, Strawberry, Portrait, Child, Little Girl

A portrait of strawberries and the child who will eat them.


Happy Birthday Princess!

Child-Portrait-Ashley-2001

Today is my daughter’s 18th birthday.
The photograph is how I will always think of her.


Santa’s Little Helper

Santa-Little-Helper

It’s that time of year again!